University of Southern California

Volume 87, Number 1 (November, 2013)

  • xxx

    The Defibrillation of NOTA: How Establishing Federal Regulation of Waitlist Eligibility May Save Organ Transplant Patients with Disabilities from Flat-Lining
    Note by Danielle Richards

    Imagine this: thirty-five-year-old identical twin males are admitted into a hospital for congestive heart failure. Neither twin smokes nor drinks. Neither has other underlying medical conditions. There is, however, one distinct difference between them: at birth, twin “A,” Alex, was delivered normally, but twin “B,” Brian, had his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, causing oxygen deprivation and resulting in moderate mental disability. As adults, Alex is completely independent, but Brian is...

  • xxx

    Disapproving Death: Amending the Interstate Agreement on Detainers in Light of United States v. Pleau
    Note by John Jason Kreager

    Dear Governor Chafee, My brother was murdered by Jason Pleau. Our family is hoping for justice for David. It is time for you to stop wasting taxpayers money on this attempt to protect a murderer from being properly prosecuted by the federal system. . . . If your son Caleb was shot in the head, in broad daylight while doing his job you would be horrified, as we were! . . . Never in our wildest dreams did we think that the Governor of our state, would get on his own bandwagon to protec...

  • xxx

    Ring-Fencing
    Article by Steven L. Schwarcz

    “Ring-fencing” is often touted as a regulatory solution to problems in banking, finance, public utilities, and insurance. However, both the precise meaning of ring-fencing, as well as the nature of the problems that ring-fencing regulation purports to solve, are ill-defined. This Article examines the functions and conceptual foundations of ring-fencing. In a regulatory context, the term can best be understood as legally deconstructing a firm in order to more optimally reallocate and reduce risk....

  • xxx

    Privacy, the Hacker Way
    Article by Andrea M. Matwyshyn

    This Article seeks to clarify the relationship between contract law and promises of privacy and information security. It challenges three commonly held misconceptions in privacy literature regarding the relationship between contract and data protection—the propertization fatalism, the economic value fatalism, and the displacement fatalism—and argues in favor of embracing contract law as a way to enhance consumer privacy. Using analysis from Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc., marketing theory, and the w...

Donate

Make a tax deductible contribution to the Southern California Law Review.

  • Donate

Sponsors

  • Irell & Manella
  • Jones Day

Donors

Hosted By

  • USC Gould School of Law