University of Southern California

Volume 76, Number 5 (July, 2003)

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    None of Your Business (Interest): The Argument for Protecting All Employee Behavior with No Business Impact
    Note by Jason Bosch

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, major American companies had entire departments staffed with hundreds of—sociological specialists who were charged with monitoring the private behavior of company employees—often in their homes—to make sure they did not drink too much, had appropriate sex lives, kept their houses clean, and used their leisure time properly. Worker privacy and autonomy has made tremendous advances since that time, but even today employers continue to take actions against...

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    The Takings Clause As a Comparative Right
    Article by John E. Fee

    The role of the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment in requiring compensation for government actions that treat landowners unequally is seldom explored. This is remarkable given that the Supreme Court has said for more than a century that the Takings Clause “prevents the public from loading upon one individual more than his just share of the burdens of government, and says that when he surrenders to the public something more and different from that which is exacted from other members of the pu...

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    Copyright Law As a Silencing Restriction on Noninfringing Materials: Unveiling the Scope of Copyright’s Diversity Externalities
    Article by Guy Pessach

    The main argument presented in this Article is that the harms and social costs of copyright cannot be summarized just in terms of enclosure and exclusion. Copyright law, I will argue, also has a silencing effect toward noninfringing creative materials of other independent creators and producers. Recent scholarly work has emphasized copyright’s “dynamic effect,” that is, the ongoing influence of expansive copyright protection toward an enclosure of the creative commons, and diminishment of cul...

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    Reading Zelman: The Triumph of Pluralism, and Its Effect on Liberty, Equality, and Choice
    Article by Joseph P. Viteritti

    In June 2002, the United States Supreme Court approved an Ohio program that made available publicly supported vouchers for children in Cleveland to attend private (nonsectarian) and religious schools. Writing for a five-member majority in Zelman v. Simmons-Harris, Chief Justice William Rehnquist held that the Ohio program did not violate the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment because it (1) has a valid secular purpose of providing educational assistance to poor children; (2) is neutral...

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    Race, Reasonableness, and the Rule of Law
    Note by Aaron Goldstein

    In recognition of the fearsome powers faced by defendants, the criminal justice system has built into it a multitude of counterbalancing defendants’ rights. There exists, however, a special breed of criminal trial involving a third and even weaker voice, a voice that may not even be heard during the trial. Criminal defendants who claim they committed acts of violence only in self-defense place their victims on trial – sometimes rightfully, sometimes to avoid well-deserved guilt. The wealth of pr...

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    Supplying the Tax Shelter Industry: Contingent Fee Compensation for Accountants Spurs Production
    Note by Ben Wang

    The use of abusive tax shelters by major corporations has been called “‘the most serious compliance issue threatening the American tax system . . . .'” Losses to the Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) are estimated to range anywhere from $7 billion to $30 billion per year. Meanwhile, corporate profits have risen 23.5% while their corresponding tax obligations rose by only 7.7%. Personal income taxes, on the other hand, are up 44%, which represents 79% of the total federal income tax and is...

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